Sixth Form

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religious education

 “The lamps are different but the light is the same”

Rumi 

In Religious Education (RE) we offer a broad curriculum which encompasses the main teachings from the major six world religions, in Key Stage 3. In Key Stage 4, we focus on the beliefs, teachings and practices of Islam and Judaism (in line with Edexcel specification A) alongside Philosophical and ethical thought.  All students at B.G.G.S study RE to GCSE level at least, and many study it to A Level.

RE is a highly popular subject amongst students, attracting both internal and external students, who often choose to continue the study of religious education at Key Stage 5 where they take papers in the Philosophy of Religion, Religion and Ethics and a Major World Religion.

The RE curriculum offered at Bordesley Green Girls' School and Sixth Form aims to challenge misconceptions, develop holistic religious and non-religious world views, and encourages our students to become open minded, empathetic, respectful and tolerant individuals who value diversity as well as develop social, moral, spiritual and cultural sensitivity and awareness. 

The teaching and learning methodology deployed gives students a deep learning experience in which the teachers of RE employ various pedagogical strategies to help students reflect, empathise, and develop communication skills along with rational reasoning and enquiry.

Our aim is to equip and enrich our students to learn about and from religious and non-religious diversity in the 21st century and become global and positively contributing citizens living in a multi-ethnic and multi-faith world.

Assessment

Year 7

Year 8

Year 9

Year 10

Year 11

Year 12 - Philosophy of Religion

Year 12 - Religion & Ethics

Year 13 - Philosophy of Religion

Year 13 - Religion & Ethics

Year 7 RE

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

Introduction to RE:

Birth ceremonies in different religions:

What are the major world religions?

Who were the key founders of key Religions?

What are the names of holy places, Holy books and main festivals of main world religions?

Why birth ceremonies are important for religious people?

How birth ceremonies are celebrated in different religions?

What rituals take place during these birth ceremonies?

What symbolism is used and how it helps families to raise their children as religious believers?

 

Students produce power point/presentations on world religions.

Assessment on birth ceremonies

End of year test

 

Spring

Creation Stories ILP (group assessment)

Identify key vocabulary used for creation stories from any religious/non-religious source

Describe the key beliefs of your chosen creation story

Who is the creator, what was created, how long did it take to create the world?

Explain why it is important to learn about the creation stories and the impact it has on people.

Explain how and why humans are expected to care for this earth?

Analyse different views about creation stories and the impact it has on religious and non-religious people in our society

Give your own response to the creation of this world

 

Students produce presentations as a group and teacher assesses each presentation and give a stage and feedback

End of year test

Summer

Living by Rules:

Why it is important for people to follow rules?

Why are 5 pillars so important to Muslims and what do they learn through these pillars?

What is the reason for wearing a Hijab in Islam? What are the reasons and benefits?

What are Sikhs learning through the 5 K’s?

What is the significance of the 10commandments for Jews in Judaism?

 

Assessment on Religious clothing for Believers in different religions.

End of year test

 

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Revising key content using bite size revision website

Wider Reading around the topic

Reading relevant books from the library

Reading newspaper article around the topic to broaden Knowledge

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Year 8 RE:

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

1) Give our world a chance ILP

Cross-curricular project with Geography

Identify key environmental issues and list how they are affecting the wellbeing of our society.

Describe one environmental issue, outlining its causes and the problems it poses to our environment

Explain the impact this environmental issue is having or will have on our lives and the world.

Analyse different solutions to this problem. Explain how people can prevent further problems and improve our environment.

Give two opposite opinions on this topic.

2) Religious attitude to wealth

To identify the key terminology that is used for charity in different religions.

To describe your personal view on causes of poverty. Do you think natural disasters are the main causes of world poverty? 

To explain why religion encourages helping people in need. What are the different types of Charities for example Zakah and Sadaqa in Islam? How are charity organizations trying to overcome poverty?

To analyse different views on how wealth should be distributed, how charity organizations can succeed in eliminating world poverty from our society and give your opinion on wealth and how it should be spent.

 

Students produce group presentations and teacher assesses each group

Assessment /exam question: Religious attitude to wealth

End of year test

 

Spring

Religious leaders

List why leaders are important in our society?

Identify the main qualities that are needed for a good leader. Give some background on your chosen religious leader.

Discuss why society considers these qualities to be important.

Describe some of the key achievements of your chosen leader and explain the kind of work your chosen leader has done.

Explain how the teachings of their religion might have influenced the actions of your chosen leader in detail. How it has made a positive impact in society?

Analyse the work of your chosen leader in detail. Give some examples of the achievements and sacrifices that were made to achieve their goals.

Give your opinion on the work of your chosen leader and how it has or might inspire other people to do well and follow them.

 

Students produce an essay on ‘My favourite leader’

End of year test

Summer

Rites of passages

Identify and define key words related to rites of passages in different religions.

Describe why identity is so important for religious believers?

Explain why festivals are important for religious people

Analyse different views on how rites of passages can help one to become a better person. Give reasons for and against this view.

 

Students answer an exam question on rites of passages from different religions

End of year test

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Revising key content using bite size revision website

Wider Reading around the topic

Reading relevant books from the library

Reading newspaper article around the topic to broaden Knowledge

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Year 9 RE: 

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

Marriage and family life

Religion: Islam and Christianity

Identify different types of family in UK

Describe religious beliefs and teachings on family life

Describe what people value and believe about family life, what one religion might teach about co-habitation.

Explain religious teachings on the importance of family life and why sexual relationship is only allowed within marriage.

Focus on why there are different Muslim attitudes to contraception

Support and explain with religious teachings / significance and discuss how people’s beliefs affect their behaviour.

Develop my opinion on the topic, giving more than one reason and comment on the changing nature of family life

Analyse, in detail, evaluating the opinions of others and explain why people have different views on the topic.

 

GCSE style exam question on Marriage and family life topic

End of year test

Spring

Living the Jewish life

Religion: Judaism

Identify key words related to Shabbat

Describe why Synagogue services are important for Jews?

Explain Two important services that take place in the Synagogue? Why prayer in the home or private prayer is important to Jews?

Support and explain with religious references from the Torah.

Give my opinion on the importance of celebrating Jewish festivals.

Analyse different opinions on this topic and use this to inform my own opinion.

Support and explain with religious references from the Torah.

Analyse, in detail, evaluating the opinions of others and explain why people have different views on the topic.

 

GCSE style exam question on living the Jewish life topic

End of year test

Summer

Matters of life and death

Religion: Islam and Christianity

Identify three things that will happen on the day of resurrection.

Describe key reasons why moral issues are so controversial.

Describe why this belief is important to Muslims/Christians.

Explain why some Christians/Muslims do not agree with a particular moral issue.

Support and explain my work with religious teachings / significance and discuss how people’s belief affects their behaviour.

Develop your opinion on this topic (life after death), giving more than one reason and support it with discussing the social and religious impacts.

Analyse the key question and give your view on this issue.

Analyse, in detail, evaluating the opinions of others and EXPLAIN why people have different views on the topic.

GCSE style exam question on Matters of life and death topic

End of year test

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Revising key content using bite size revision website

Wider Reading around the topic

Reading relevant books from the library

Reading newspaper article around the topic to broaden Knowledge

 Top of the page]

Year 10 RE (GCSE) 

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

1.Practices

What is the meaning and significance of the Shahadah?

What is the significance of Salah in Islam?

What is the practice and significance of Sawm during Ramadan?

What is the significance of Zakat in Islam?

What is the nature, significance and purpose of hajj?

What is the significance of religious festivals?

How do the Islamic teachings on greater and lesser jihad affect the life of a Muslim?

What caused the split in Islam?

What are the main differences between Shi’a and Sunni beliefs and practices?

2.Beliefs and teachings

(Religion Islam)

Why are these beliefs important for Muslims?

How are the six beliefs understood and expressed in the Muslim community?

How are the five roots of Usul ad-Din central to Shi’a Muslim beliefs?

Do you think one of the Usul ad-Din is more important than the others?

How are the Characteristics of Allah shown in the Quran?

Why are these characteristics important?

Why is the belief in Prophecy so important for Muslims?

What are the Muslim Holy books and why are they so significant?

What is the nature of Malaikah?

How are Jibrael, Mika’il and Izrael shown in the Quran?

What is the nature of predestination and why is it important?

What is human freedom?

How do al-qadr and human freedom relate to the day of Judgement?

What are the implications of belief in al-qadr fir Muslims today?

What are the Muslim teachings about life after death?

What is the nature of Judgement, Paradis and hell?

How are Judgement, paradise and hell shown in the Quran?

How do Muslim teachings about life after death affect the life of a Muslim today?

What is the Humanist and non-religious beliefs about life after death and how do Muslims response to this?

What is the significance of Angels for Muslims today?

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Spring

3.Practices (Judaism)

What is meant by public acts of worship?

What is the nature and purpose of public worship?

What type of services take place in the Synagogue?

Why Synagogue services are important for Jewish community?

What is the nature and purpose of the Tenakh?

What is the significance of Tenakh (written law) and Talmud (oral law)?

What is the nature and purpose of Jewish food law, including Kosher, Trefiah and separation of dairy food including reference to Deuteronomy 14:3–10?

What are the implications of the Jewish food laws for Jews today?

What is the nature and purpose of prayer in the home and of private prayer?

Why do Jews pray three times a day?

Why do Jews have different forms of prayers, including interpretations of Psalm 55:16–23?

What are the different types of prayer that take place during public worship?

How and when are the Shema and Amidah prayers said?

Assess when the Shema and Amidah might be used and why (AO2)

Why are rituals so important for Jewish people?

What is the purpose of various ceremonies like birth, Brit-milah, Bar and Bat mitzvah, marriage and death rituals?

Why festivals are important in Jewish history?

What is the purpose behind celebrating the Jewish festivals?

How are these festivals celebrated in home and at the Synagogue?

What are the Key features of the Synagogue?

Why is the Synagogue so important within the Jewish community?

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Summer

4.Religious teachings of families and relationships (Philosophy and ethics from Islamic perspective)

Why is marriage important in Islam?

What are different non-religious attitudes towards marriage?

What does Islam say about sex outside marriage?

What are the non-religious attitudes to sex outside of marriage and how do Muslims respond to it?

What are Muslim teachings on the importance of family life?

How families do strengthen the Ummah?

What role do mosques play in keeping the Ummah strong?

What are different Muslim teachings on contraception?

How is divorce seen in Islam?

What are the non-religious teachings on divorce and re-marriage?

What does Islam teach about the equality of men and women in the family?

How do Muslim teachings oppose gender prejudice and discrimination?

 

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Revising key content using revision booklets given from school and bite size revision website

Wider Reading around the topic

Reading relevant books from the library

Reading newspaper article around the topic to broaden Knowledge

 Top of the page]

Year 11 RE (GCSE)

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

1.Sources of wisdom and authority (Islam religion)

What do you know about the revelation and compilation of the Quran?

How significant is the authority of the Quran within Islam?

How is the Quran used in the daily life of a Muslims, through formal and informal worship?

Analyse how the Quran is used as a source of teaching and guidance at home and in Mosques?

How is the Quran used in the daily life of a Muslims, through formal and informal worship?

Analyse how the Quran is used as a source of teaching and guidance at home and in Mosques?

What do you know about Prophet Muhammad?

How important was his call to Prophet hood?

What were the main achievements in Madina and Mecca?

How significant were his achievements at that time and now for Muslims in the 21CE?

Why is Prophet Muhammad so important in Islam?

Who are the Ahl Al Bayt and why are they important?

What are hadith and why are they important in Islam today?

What is the Shari’ah law and why is it important?

What are the different understandings and role of an Imam in Sunni and Shi’a Islam?

2. Beliefs and teachings (Judaism)

What are Jewish Beliefs about the Almighty and the Shekinah?

What is the nature and purpose of the Messiah?

Why is the covenant at Sinai important for Jews?

Why is the covenant with Abraham important for Jewish people?

What is the nature and sanctity of human life according to Judaism?

What are mitzvot and why are they important?

How might belief in life after death affect the life of Jews?

 

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Spring

3. Forms of expressions and ways of Life (Islam religion)

How the Ummah influences the lives of Muslims?

How is Muslim identity expressed through the ummah in different ceremonies and key aspects of their life?

Why do Muslims need a Mosque to pray to Allah?

What is the main purpose behind the design of the Mosque?

Why do you think it is important for Muslims not to have pictures in the Mosque?

What is the purpose of Calligraphy in Islam?

How is calligraphy used to express belief? And how it may be used in Mosque and other settings?

What is meant by Sufism?

How important are the Sufi ways of life?

What led to the emergence of Sufism and how it was established through orders, saints and practice today?

What is the purpose of fasting and Dhikr in Islam?

How significant are the Sufi practices of fasting and Dhikr (remembrance of Allah)?

Who was al-Gazali and ib-al-Rabia?

What great contributions were made by teachers like al-Ghazali, ibn al-Arabi and Rabia al-Adawiya?

What lessons can we learn from their lives?

What is Islam’s view on, dance, music and poetry within Islam with specific reference to Sufism?

How can dance, music and poetry be used to express belief as a devotional act and how may be used in other settings?

What are the differences of interpretation for the use of dance and music within Islam?

What do charity organisations do in order to eliminate the poverty and suffering in the UK?

What is the main aim of the Muslim charity Organisations?

What are the 10 Obligatory acts of Shi’a Islam?

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Summer

4.Arguments for the existence of Allah (Philosophy and ethics from Islamic perspective)

How does revelation proof the existence of Allah?

Why the beliefs about revelation important for Muslims and how do they affect their lives?

How do visions proof the existence of Allah?

How might visions lead to belief in the existence of Allah and reasons why they might not?

What are the different Muslim attitudes towards miracles and belief in Allah?

How might Miracles lead to belief in the existence of Allah and reasons why they might not?

How non-religious people may explain miracles and can use Muslim teachings to counter this view.

How might Religious experiences lead to belief in the existence of Allah and reasons why they might not?

How non-religious people may explain Religious experiences and can use Muslim teachings to counter this view.

What is the Design arguments and how does it lead to belief in Allah?

Why might some people reject the design argument?

What is the cosmological argument and how does it lead to belief in Allah?

Why might some people reject the cosmological argument?

How may evil and suffering reject belief in Allah?

How do Muslims justify the nature of Allah against the problem of evil and suffering?

 

One GCSE exam style question at the end of each topic

Modelling exam style questions

End of topic test

Mock exam

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Revising key content using revision booklets given from school and bite size revision website

Wider Reading around the topic

Reading relevant books from the library

Reading newspaper article around the topic to broaden Knowledge

 Top of the page]

Year 12 RE (AS)

Philosophy of Religion: paper 1

Term

Topic/ Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

1.2 Cosmological Argument

With reference to the ideas of Aquinas and D Hume, I Kant.

1.1 Design Argument

With reference to the ideas of W Paley and D Hume

1.3 Ontological Argument

With reference to the ideas of Anselm and B Russell.

 Clarify the notions of proof and the definitions of God in this argument.

Define key terms and add to glossary

Explore Anselm’s Ontological Argument.

Discuss and note key themes and stages of Anselm’s argument

Define key terms, types of argument, build own glossary of philosophical terms

Note key themes of Design Arguments

Analyse the challenges posed to the ontological argument by its weaknesses and the ideas discussed by Russell.

Debate the idea there are fundamental flaws in the OA (Act)

Evaluate the success of this type of argument.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Spring

2.1 The nature of religious experience

With reference to the ideas of W James and R Otto

Influence of religious experience as an argument for the existence

of God

Problem of evil and suffering

With reference to the ideas of D Hume and J Mackie.

Theodicies and solutions to the problem of suffering

With reference to the ideas of Augustine and Irenaeus.

Explore the main ideas in religious experience as an argument for the existence of God.

Analyse the strengths and weaknesses of religious experience as an argument for the existence of God.

Explore the nature of the problem of evil and suffering.

Explore the ideas of different theodicies.

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of a variety of responses to the problem of suffering.

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Summer

Anthology (Evil and Suffering, the context of the writings of Russell and Copleston and the way these ideas are applied to issues in religion and belief,

including the argument from contingency and religious experience)

6.3 Religion and science debates and their significance for philosophy of religion

With reference to the ideas of C Darwin and R Dawkins

Evaluate the strengths of Mackie’s argument

Explore methodologies in science and religion.

Clarify the impact of miracles on this area.

Clarify ideas regarding creation and scientific cosmologies.

Evaluate the differences, similarities and strengths and weaknesses of these views.

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home;

Wider reading around the topic using bite size revision websites

Reading relevant books from the library

Newspaper articles on relevant topics

Students going over content covered in school on regular weekly basis

Read scholarly work as stated  on syllabus overview

 Top of the page]

Year 12 RE-Religion and ethics: Paper 2

World religion Islam paper 4 

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

                                                                       Autumn

Significant concepts in issues or debates in religion and ethics:

Environmental issues

With reference to the ideas of J Lovelock and A Næss.

With reference to the ideas of Martin Luther King and JoniEareckson Tada

A study of three ethical theories:

Utilitarianism

With reference to the ideas of J Bentham and J S Mill.

Situation Ethics

With reference to the ideas of J A T Robinson and J Fletcher.

Natural Moral Law

With reference to the ideas of Aquinas and B Hoose.

Outline and analyse key themes in environmental issues.

Outline and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of one religious and one secular perspective to environmental issues.

Explore the work of one significant figure in the campaign for equality.

Explore the challenges areas of disagreement and debate.

Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the applying religious perspectives to these debates.

Clarify the approach to moral decision making in this theory. (Utilitarianism)

Explore Bentham’s or Mill’s form of Utilitarianism.

Analyse the challenges posed to the theory.

Evaluate the success of Utilitarianism.

Clarify the approach to moral decision making in this theory (situation ethics)

Explore Fletcher’s distinctive approach to Situation Ethics.

Analyse the challenges posed to the theory.

Evaluate the success of Situation Ethics.

Clarify the approach to moral decision making in this theory. (NML)

Explore Aquinas’ understanding of Natural Moral Law.

Analyse the challenges posed to the theory.

Evaluate the effectiveness of NML..

 

Spring

Application of ethical theories to issues of importance:

War and peace

With reference to the ideas of Augustine and Aquinas.

Sexual Ethics

With reference to the ideas of P Vardy and J Dominion.

(Islam: world Religion-Paper 4)

Religious beliefs, values and teachings:

The interpretation and application of the Six Beliefs

Sources of wisdom and

Authority.

The meaning and significance of the life and work of the Prophet

Muhammad in its historical, political, religious and social context and assessment of his significance for Muslims today

The key events in the life of Muhammad and his sayings as a basis for Muslim living,

With reference to the ideas of S H Nasr and F R Malik.

Explore the contribution made by the Just War Theory.

Explore the success of the Just War Theory.

Assess the strengths and weaknesses of the applying religious perspectives to views about pacifism.

Outline and analyse key themes in sexual ethics.

Outline and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of one religious and one secular perspective to sexual ethics.

To explore the key concepts of the following Six Beliefs and their importance for Muslims.

•Allah: Tawhid and its significance; Names of Allah

•Angels: What these are and their roles in relation to Muhammad and mankind

•Scriptures: The Revelation of Allah and the nature and significance of the Qur’an.

To explore the following:

•The compilation and authority of the Qur’an with specific reference to its status as the revealed word of Allah, its revelation and formation, purpose and message.

•Types of authority and the Qur’an as the basis and source of authority for all Muslim belief and practice.

•The use of the Qur’an and the Hadith in the establishment of Shari’ah law, and its various interpretations and expressions, including its application to key moral principles and activities.

To explore the following:

•The key events of the life of Muhammad and their significance for Muslim practice today (as shown in the Specification).

•The significance of these in understanding the role of Muhammad and his importance for Muslims today.

To study the key concepts and traditional attitudes and responses to the following Six Beliefs and reasons for them.

To explore the following:

•Prophets: the role of the prophets; examples of the prophets and Muhammed’s role as Seal of the Prophets.

•Akirah: Judgment and the Last Day in the Qur’an and Muslim Tradition; After Life in Muslim thought and implications of Akirah.

•Al Qad’r: ‘The command of God is a decree determined’ (Sura 13 v.42, Allah’s Master-Plan for the Universe).

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/

Teacher assessment

Summer

 Practices that

shape and

express religious

identity

The central role of the five pillars of Islam as fulfilling the purpose

of life to live in submission to the will of Allah and a way of shaping and expressing religious identity.

The key events in the life of Muhammad and his sayings as a basis for Muslim living.

a) The Hadith and Sunnah, their compilation and authority.

b) The significance and implications of the Hadith and Sunnah for Muslim living.

The interpretation, significance, treatment and use of the Qur’an.

specific reference to surah 1 and 2.

To explore the following:

•The Five Pillars as expressions of Islamic belief.

•The meaning and importance of individual pillars and their unity as the basis of Islamic practice and identity today:

O Shahadah

O Salah

O Zakah

• Their practice, significance, and any difference in understanding between Sunni and Shi’a Islam.

To explore the following:

•Types of authority and the distinctive emphases of the Hadith and Sunnah.

•The compilation and authority of the Hadith and Sunnah.

•The importance of the Hadith and Sunnah in the lives of Muslims

To explore on the following:

•The compilation and authority of the Qur’an with specific reference to its status as the revealed word of Allah, its revelation and formation, purpose and message.

•Types of authority and the Qur’an as the basis and source of authority for all Muslim belief and practice.

•The use of the Qur’an and the Hadith in the establishment of Shari’ah law, and its various interpretations and expressions, including its application to key moral principles and activities.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/

Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Wider reading around the topic using bite size revision websites

Reading relevant books from the library

Newspaper articles on relevant topics

Students going over content covered in school on regular weekly basis

Read scholarly work as stated  on syllabus overview

 Top of the page]

Year 13 RE:

Philosophy of Religion paper 1

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

 Religious language

Analogy and Symbol

With reference to the ideas of Aquinas

Verification and falsification debates

Language games

With reference to the ideas of L Wittgenstein and D Phill

Explore the notions of analogy and symbol and evaluate the strengths and problems of these types of religious language.

Clarify the different approaches to the meaningfulness of religious language.

Assess the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.

Explore the terminology of the meaning of language.

Clarify the ideas of Wittgenstein and Phillips in this topic.

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Spring

 Influences of developments

in religious belief

Views about life after death across a range of religious traditions

With reference to the ideas of J Hick

Points for discussion about life after death

With reference to the ideas of Plato and Aristotle

Clarify the meaning of key terms in this topic.

Explore the different views regarding the possibility and nature of life after death.

Clarify ideas regarding the relationship between mind and body.

Analyse and evaluate ideas regarding life after death related to evidence, near death experiences, language and moral reasoning.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Summer

Works of scholars

Context to critiques of religious belief and points for discussion

With reference to the ideas of R Dawkins and M Westphal

A comparison between a critic of religion, Bertrand Russell, and a religious believer, Frederick Copleston

Clarify key terms of Atheism and agnosticism.

Assess strengths and weaknesses of religious belief and alternative explanations of religion.

Explore the context of this debate and the background of these key thinkers.

Clarify the views of Russell and Copleston.

Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these positions.

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Wider reading around the topic using bite size revision websites

Reading relevant books from the library

Newspaper articles on relevant topics

Students going over content covered in school on regular weekly basis

Read scholarly work as stated  on syllabus overview

 Top of the page]

Year 13: Religion and ethics paper 2

World Religion Islam Paper 4 

Term

Topic     Key questions:

Type of Assessment

Autumn

 Deontology, Virtue Ethics and the works of scholars

A comparison of the work of Immanuel Kant and Aristotle with regard to Deontology and Virtue Ethics respectively.

Issues in medical ethics with a focus on beginning and end of life debates:

Clarify this approach to moral decision making.

Explore Kant’s distinctive form of Deontology.

Analyse the challenges posed to the theory.

Evaluate the value of a prima facie approach to deontological thinking.

Explore the key concepts of this ethical theory.

Analyse the challenges posed to the theory.

Evaluate the value of a Eudaimonia as a guide to living morally.

Explore the context of this debate and the background of these key thinkers.

Clarify Evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of these positions. The views of Kant and Aristotle.

Outline and analyse key themes in medical ethics.

Outline and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of one religious and one secular perspective on medical ethics.

Outline and analyse key themes in medical ethics.

Outline and analyse the strengths and weaknesses of one religious and one secular perspective to medical ethics.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Spring

Ethical language

Meta-ethics

The relationship between religion and morality

(World religion Islam-Paper 4)

Social and Historical Developments

The origins and features of the differences between and development of Sunni and Shi’a Islam following the death of the Prophet Muhammad

With reference to the ideas of K Armstrong and S H Nasr.

The meaning and importance of the Rightly Guided Caliphs in Islam and to the spread of Islam

Martyrdom of Husain

With reference to the ideas of H Halm and N Ahmed.

With reference to the ideas of R Geaves and W Chittick.

Clarify the different approaches to the role of ethical language.

Assess the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches.

Explore the terminology.

Clarify the differing relationships between religion and morality.

To explore the following:

Students will focus on:

•The key people, events and beliefs, including the importance of the companions of the Prophet (including Abu Bakr) and the family of the Prophet (including Ali) and their impact on the Sunni/Shi’a split.

•Debates surrounding divine authority, succession and representation and their respective importance for different types of Islam. This should include reference to the Caliphate and the Imams, and some later examples of how the caliphate was expressed in practice.

•The importance of the Rightly Guided Caliphs in Islam and to the spread of Islam.

•The historical and religious context of this period such as major developments, geographical, migration, economic and social factors and ‘Umayyad’ and ‘Abbasid’ dynasties.

•The significance of the martyrdom of Husain in 680 CE to Shi’a history and practices.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Summer

 

The development and rise of Sufism as a movement within existing traditions.

The relationship between Islam and science

Comparative study of Jihad in the works of two scholars 

The challenges of multi-faith societies, pluralism, religious freedom and interfaith dialogue.

Gender and Islam

Challenges of secularisation

The challenges of multi-faith societies, pluralism, religious

freedom and interfaith dialogue

A comparison of the significant ideas about the challenges of the secularisation and the modern ‘Western’ world; the impact of

migration and how these have been met by different traditions of

Islam

 

•What is the history and practices of Sufi Islam and reasons why these mystical and devotional ideas about a more personal relationship with Allah developed.

•To explore the extent to which Sufism penetrated existing Muslim-majority societies and the ways in which it did so.

•What is the significance of involvement and support in and for issues of science such as creation and scientific method for Muslims today and in history.

•What is the significance of jihad for Muslims today and in history.

•The significance of lesser and greater jihad in Islam.

•The significance, and any difference in understanding and practice between Ramadan and Khadduri.

•To focus on the significance of involvement and support in and for, religious freedom, religious tolerance, pluralism and interfaith dialogue for Muslims today and in history.

Students will focus on:

•The significance of men and women in Islam.

•The significance of men and women in the family.

•Feminist approaches in contemporary Islam their significance, and any difference in understanding and practice between different forms of Islam.

To focus:

•The impact and interpretation of Shari’ah law, including interpretations of different teachings, evidence for these views, contextual issues and textual materials, assessment of their significance for Islam, implications for beliefs and practices and moral behaviour, including links to liberationist approaches within Islam.

 

One/two exam style questions per topic under timed conditions

Modelling exam questions during lessons

End of topic tests

End of year tests

Mock papers

Self/Peer/Teacher assessment

Extra-Curricular Activities/ How you can help at home:

Wider reading around the topic using bite size revision websites

Reading relevant books from the library

Newspaper articles on relevant topics

Students going over content covered in school on regular weekly basis

Read scholarly work as stated  on syllabus overview

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How we assess the impact what your child has been taught:

Religious Education

How will classwork be marked/

monitored/

graded/

self-assessed?

KS3

All general classwork will be tick marked. If the work has a cross next to it, then you need to check and go over it again

Tasks where students demonstrate their learning i.e. exam questions will be marked by teacher/ peer/self-assessment

Once a half term the DIRT sheet with comments will be used for formative marking and self-reflection from students

KS4

All general classwork will be tick marked. If the work has a cross next to it, then you need to check and go over it again

Tasks where students demonstrate their learning i.e. exam questions will be marked by teacher/ peer/self-assessment

Once a half term the DIRT sheet with comments will be used for formative marking and self-reflection from students

Practice exam questions will be given marks and feed back

KS5

Class work will be self-assessed or peer assessed, using success criteria/mark scheme/oral feedback from the teacher

Practice exam questions will be given marks and feed back

What classwork will be marked?

KS3

Exam style questions (this could be self/peer/teacher marked)

KS4

Exam questions(this could be self/peer/teacher marked)

KS5

Exam questions/essays(this could be self/peer/teacher marked)

How will students ‘reflect’ on marking/ feedback?

KS3

Students fill in the new pink marking DIRT

Students fill their assessment booklets

Self/peer assessment in green during lessons when needed

KS4

Students fill in the new pink marking DIRT sheets

Students fill their assessment booklets

Self/peer assessment in green during lessons when needed

KS5

Students fill their assessment booklets

Self/peer assessment in green during lessons when needed

How will Homework be marked/

monitored/

graded?

Homework-Exam questions will be marked and graded for all stages

Students will clearly indicate on homework that it was homework

Homework is not always written and knowledge will be tested in class as the students apply their learning (flipped learning) to the lesson

Homework not done will be logged on students SIMS record as behaviour issue

What are the formal Assessments? When are they marked?

KS3-one per term

KS4-one per topic

KS5-1/2 per topic